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40 MILLION YEARS ON THE PLANET

LET’S GUARANTEE THEM A FUTURE

Today’s rhinos are the modern day descendants of an animal which walked our planet more than 40 million years ago.  An animal who evolved from the Asian hyracodonts during the second epoch of the paleogene period. Paraceratherium is the largest land mammal to ever walk planet earth.  The titan stood over five meters tall at the shoulder, had a body which spanned 26 feet and weighed a colossal 20 tonnes.  It is believed there was once more than 30 genera and 60 different species of rhino which inhabited Europe, Asia and Africa.  Even at the beginning of the 20 century 500,000 rhinos could be found in the wild.

Today, more than 40 million years of evolution are represented by less than 24,000 individuals split between five species.  The ancestors of our modern day rhinos have survived searing heat, ice ages and prehistoric predators including hyenas and giant crocodiles.  Now they face the most dangerous predator of modern times.  Humans.

GENERAL FACTS

JAVAN RHINOS

Rhinoceros Sondaicus:

The Javan rhino is the most endangered of all five rhino species with fewer than 60 individuals left in the wild.  It is one of the world’s rarest mammals with an IUCN Red List classification of critically endangered.....FIND OUT MORE >>>

BLACK RHINOS

Diceros Bicornis:

The black rhino, also known as the “hook-lipped rhino” is the most endangered of the two African species and is classified as critically endangered.  It’s smaller and more aggressive than than the white rhino.....FIND OUT MORE >>>

WHITE RHINOS

Ceratotherium Simum:

The white rhino is one of two species found in Africa and is the most populated of all five rhino species.  Easily identifiable by it’s large wide mouth the species is often referred to as the “square-lipped rhino” or “wide mouth rhino”…..FIND OUT MORE >>>

SUMATRAN RHINOS

Diceohinus Sumatrensis:

After poaching, habitat loss has been a major cause for the dramatic decline of the Sumatran rhino as their natural habitat is cleared to make way for palm oil plantations.  The species has declined in excess of 50% in just two decades.....FIND OUT MORE >>>

THREATS TO RHINOS

These majestic creatures have traversed savannahs and bushveld, wallowed in the swamps of tropical forests, survived searing heat and freezing ice ages for more than 40 million years, yet today, they are precariously close to extinction.....FIND OUT MORE >>>

INDIAN RHINOS

Rhinoceros Unicornis:

Also known as the greater one horned rhino has experienced a population recovery deemed a conservation success. In 1975 only around 600 were found in the wild.  Today, the population has grown to around 3500.....FIND OUT MORE >>>

Class:

Mammalia

Order:

Perissodactyla (an ungulate with an odd number of toes)

Family:

Rhinocerotidae

1

Rhinos are a keystone species and have a major impact on the structure of the habitat and health of the ecosystem. Research in February 2014 by the Journal of Ecology revealed rhino inhabited areas contained 20 times more grazing lawns. The study also revealed areas where fewer rhino lived  has 60-80% less short grass cover.

2

Rhinos are ungulates (an ungulate is an animal with hoofed feet)

3

Rhinos are herbivores and categorised as either browsers or grazers

4

A group of rhinos are called a crash

5

The name rhinoceros is a combination of two Greek words.  "Rhino" which means nose and "ceros" meaning horn

6

Black rhinos eat the equivalent of just over 500 chocolates bars every day

7

Adult rhinos can produce up to 50lbs of dung each day

8

White rhinos have communal toilets called "middens".  Middens are like a huge message board for rhinos

9

The closest living relatives to rhinos are tapirs, horses and zebras

10

Most wild rhino calves never meet their father

11

A rhino named Andatu was the first Sumatran rhino ever born in captivity in Indonesia on 23rd June 2012

12

Rhinos use their horns as protection, guiding their calves and as a tool to uproot grass or dig water beds